Question: Can My Employer Change My Working Hours UK?

Can my employer change my shift pattern UK?

Your contract of employment or local policy may allow your employer to change your shift pattern if they follow the correct process.

Your contract may also state that, provided you are given a fixed amount of notice, your working pattern can be changed..

What is the 8 44 rule?

Most employees are entitled to overtime pay. There are some exemptions for certain industries and professions. Overtime is all hours worked over 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week, whichever is greater (8/44 rule).

It is good practice, but not a legal requirement, for your employer to give you a detailed job description. However, the written statement of particulars, which your employer must give you on or before your first day at work, must contain the title and/or a brief description of your job.

Ben Jones, UK Lawyer. To answer your questions: It is not a legal requirement for either employees or employers to sign time sheets. … For instance, if the employer knows what hours have been worked but the employee has forgotten to submit their timesheet?

Can an employer just change your work schedule?

If the contract permits the employer to change the days on which you work, it is likely that you will be required to change your shifts. However, if the contract states that your working pattern is 20 hours per week over 3 days, the employer is not permitted to change your shift pattern without your agreement.

Can my employer change my timesheet UK?

While falsification of an employee’s time sheet can be a serious offense, it isn’t illegal for a supervisor or employer to change an employee’s time sheet – as long as it reflects the correct hours that were worked and you notify the employee of these changes.

Can an employer change your schedule without notifying you?

The Department of Labor specifies that “an employer may change an employee’s work hours without giving prior notice or obtaining the employee’s consent (unless otherwise subject to a prior agreement between the employer and employee or the employee’s representative)”.

Can I refuse to sign a new contract of employment UK?

If an employer makes a change to a contract without getting agreement (including by using flexibility clauses unreasonably), employees may: have the right to refuse to work under the new conditions. say that they’re working any new terms under protest, and are treating the change as a breach of contract.

Can my employer take hours away from me?

What Can You Do? Usually, reduced hours are at the request of the employee – for personal reasons – and the discretion of the employer. In your case, the fact that you have been given reduced hours suggests that you are either in a seasonal job or that your company may be experiencing some difficulties.

Can employer schedule you outside your availability?

Yes, they can do that. Employers have full discretion and authority in setting work days and hours.

Is falsifying a timesheet a crime UK?

It should be remembered that mangers have responsibility to ensure the claim is correct before authorising and approving any claims. Dishonestly falsifying timesheets can result in sanctions, such as (but not limited to) disciplinary action, a criminal conviction, a fine, and/or even a prison sentence.

How much notice does an employer have to give for a schedule change?

An employee must not be required to change from one shift to another without at least 24 hours’ written notice and at least 8 hours’ rest between shifts.

Can employer force me to sign new contract?

A contract of employment is a legal agreement between the employer and the employee. Its terms cannot lawfully be changed by the employer without agreement from the employee (either individually or through a recognised trade union). … Your employer should not breach equality laws when changing contract terms.

Can an employer force you to sign a new contract UK?

Getting agreement Usually, the employer and employee both need to agree to any contract changes. But an employee can insist on a change if they have a legal right to it.

Can employees be dismissed for refusing to accept new terms and conditions of employment?

What is clear from the judgment is that an employer, in the context of a retrenchment exercise at least, may dismiss employees for refusing to accept a change to terms and conditions of employment, provided of course that the employer can demonstrate that there is a genuine operational need to change terms and …